Tag Archives: visitors

Visit1862 Field Trip for the International Conference of Historical Geographers 2015

On Wednesday 8th July the editors of visit1862.com had the privilege of running a field trip as part of the International Conference of Historical Geographers. Comprised of seven historical geographers with a wide range interests including the development of museums, … Continue reading

Posted in The Journal | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Visit1862 Field Trip for the International Conference of Historical Geographers 2015

Aesthetic Analysis and Visitors’ Experience of the 1862 International Exhibition

On 27th and 28th June 2014, the editors of visit1862 had the pleasure of being part of the London Conference of Critical Thought.  Presenting on a panel of rare historical voices within the conference’s discussions about Deleuze, the everyday political, … Continue reading

Posted in The Experience | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Aesthetic Analysis and Visitors’ Experience of the 1862 International Exhibition

Picnic at the Palace

Alexandra Palace – or the People’s Palace, as it has been branded since its construction and opening in the second-half of the nineteenth century – proudly stands surveying north-east London.  With sandwiches and sun cream, we planted ourselves upon a … Continue reading

Posted in The Journal | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Picnic at the Palace

The Who’s Who of 1862

April 2014 Dedicated to the memory of Henry Cole (15th July 1808 – 18th April 1882) As researchers of the 1862 International Exhibition, there are certain dates which stand out in our calendar. Today is one of them: the 132rd … Continue reading

Posted in The Journal | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Who’s Who of 1862

Love 1862: Royal Romance

The day itself is with us! So, from the editors of visit1862, here is our Valentine gift to you: In 1858, after at least seven years of matchmaking, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert finally married their eldest daughter, Princess Victoria, … Continue reading

Posted in The Objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Love 1862: Royal Romance

Love 1862: Rival Roses

So, there’s no escaping it, its just one more day until Valentines Day (we can already hear the collective groans!). However… what about the fortunate few with many Valentines?  Our cartoon today depicts two such young ladies in the gardens … Continue reading

Posted in The Objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Love 1862: Rival Roses

Love 1862: Bewitched!

So, it’s that time of year again, when advertisements for dating sites are everywhere, pink chocolate hearts are for sale, and plans are made for Valentines Day (love it or loath it).  During our 1862 research we’ve come across some … Continue reading

Posted in The Objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Love 1862: Bewitched!

The Empty Chair: Designing A ‘Royal’ Experience

Today’s publishing date of this post marks an important date for nineteenth-century historians, for it was on Tuesday 22nd January 1901 that Queen Victoria died, at the grand old age of 81 at her beloved Osborne House.  The royal couple … Continue reading

Posted in The Experience | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Empty Chair: Designing A ‘Royal’ Experience

The Twelfth Day of an 1862 Christmas…

On the twelfth day of Christmas the 1862 Committee gave to me… twelve Drummers Drumming For our final post on the twelve days of an 1862 Christmas, let us conclude by having a look at the interior of the exhibition … Continue reading

Posted in The Objects | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Twelfth Day of an 1862 Christmas…

The Eleventh Day of an 1862 Christmas…

On the eleventh day of Christmas the 1862 Committee gave to me… eleven Pipers Piping   Although not a design from Crace’s 1862 scheme, this watercolour does demonstrate something of Crace’s approach to organ design.  In 1862, a ‘blind’ man … Continue reading

Posted in The Objects | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The Eleventh Day of an 1862 Christmas…